A Weight Loss Doctor New Year’s Resolution to Lose Weight P.3

As the cold month of January creeps to an end, I am not immune to the fad diets and the gym promotions that surround this 5’9″ 220 pound medical doctor here in Midtown, Manhattan, New York, City whose goal weight is 177 to 190 pounds over the next year.

Having been in the weight loss business, reviewed the weight loss literature, and watch my own metabolism slow (I  feel for for my cohort of people who now, when completing forms or checking the box on the elliptical trainer, check the 35 to 45 box rather than the 25 to 34 box)., I realize to lose roughly 40 pounds safely and realistically will take a year, needs to be done slow and steady. Slow and steady will win this race.

Something as subtle as eliminating the three cans of V8 vegetable juice which have about 80 calories each which sound and are healthy (minus perhaps the sodium) are 240 calories a day which are more or less what I burn daily in my morning spin class.

Oh yes, incidentally, I joined Crunch gym https://www.crunch.com in New York City.

I do not serve to endorse nor advertise them. I simply liked that their fees were reasonable (for me) at $79 monthly, no annual commitment, cancel anytime. Their approach unlike other high end gyms like Equinox–where everyone seemed “too” good looking with 1% body fat, their skin tight “sports bras” matching their sneakers”–is “come as you are.” Or I might translate, ‘so you are a little chubby, that’s ok, maybe we can get you in better shape.’

They did pitch me hard on 20 personal training sessions which I sigedn up forbut I will credit Fitness Manager Tiran Winston for giving me special attention to diet and nutrition and positive encouragement.

Tiran told me not to weigh myself daily but weekly. I didn’t listen of course having just joined the gym 5 days ago but I have lost 4 pounds since so since joining.

Of additional note, I am doing the 30 Day One Gallon a Day Water Challenge.  More to follow on that…

https://www.thrillist.com/drink/nation/i-drank-a-gallon-of-water-a-day-for-30-days-water-gallon-challenge

http://www.promaxnutrition.com/30-day-water-challenge-worth-it/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1770067/http://texas.spoonuniversity.com/live/drinking-gallon-water-day-really-looks-like/

http://livewell.jillianmichaels.com/can-lose-weight-drinking-gallon-water-day-5607.html

http://www.military.com/military-fitness/health/drinking-too-much-water

A Weight Loss Doctor New Years Resolution to Lose Weight P.2

January 15th, 2017

by Natan Schleider, M.D.

So as a 41 year old male standing 5 feet 9 inches and weighing 220 pounds (I weighed about 180 in college, always been fairly stocky genetically but even I am not immune to desiring all the Hollywood actors incredible physiques my age or older), I calculated my BMR or Basal Metabolic Rate on line.

The BMR formula also called the Harris Benedict Equation can be calculated at these websites and tells you roughly how many calories you burn each day based on height, weight, gender, lifestyle, and age:

http://www.bmi-calculator.net/bmr-calculator/harris-benedict-equation/

http://manytools.org/handy/bmr-calculator/

Once you know this, you can calculate how much of a calorie deficit you need to lose weight daily. For example, my BMR is guesstimates that if I lie in bed all day and do nothing, I burn 2441 calories to maintain my weight. Frankly that sounds high because I have been eating rather healthy (no sweets, pizza, french fries, etc) but have lost no weight in months (since I started paying attention at age 40).

Knowing that one pound of fat is 3500 calories, if I cut my calorie intake by 500 calories daily (or burn 500 more calories daily exercising), I should lose one pound a week if my diet remains unchanged. Alternatively, I reduce my calorie intake by 500 calories daily and should get the same result.

Note that after age 30, our metabolic rate slows by about 5-10 percent per decade (it feels like a lot slower personally so I’m with you if you are middle age and been eating and exercising on some level and not losing weight as you did in your 20s or 30s).

I plan on going to the gym for mostly weight lifting which I enjoy at least 15 minutes daily, cutting my daily calories by 500, and am currently trialing two medicines with data showing they promote weight loss, bupropion/naltrexone (Belviq) and will soon be adding on toprimate (Topamax).

I wish I could have the weight off in a few weeks but that is not realistic and “good things come to those who weight [pun intended].”

If anybody is reading this and wants to know how I am doing–or has any advice–I am all ears.

If I write a part 3 to this segment of my blog, I will research anti-aging medicine supplements to promote muscle mass and fat loss.

 

A Weight Loss Doctor’s New Years Resolution to Lose Weight

A Weight Loss Doctor’s New Years Resolution to Lose Weight

by Natan Schleider, M.D.

January 12th, 2017

Before starting New York House Call Physicians, I had a few temporary part time doctor jobs that honestly tough me a lot. I worked in a small emergency room. I worked for an urgenct care center chain. And I worked for a diet doctor practice.

While working as a “diet doctor,” I was 29, ran 6-10 miles every morning like a machine, and really watched my diet, namely caloric intake. If you want to lose weight simply put, put if fewer calories than you burn. As a chubby 8 year old, my grandfather whom I miss dearly–an attorney who hated his job weeding out the “fakers” who claimed disability at the insurance company he worked for, was an avid handball player in Brooklyn, NY and regular at the YMCA and bowling lanes.

Visiting him and my grandmother in Florida in their Jewish retirement community, Century Village, he pinched my love handles firmly and simply said: “What is this?”

Minutes later, he was showing me how to do leg raises and said I was to do 200 a day.

Not the first to “tease” me on my weight, by age 15 I had given up high school baseball for the gym and 10 years later, was an avid runner and “gym rat”, an athletic 175  pounds standing 5 feet 10 inches. I counted every calorie. Cocktails were always mixed with a diet beverage or club soda. No carbs were eaten after 2 pm. I took a rest day maybe once every 2 to 3 weeks. If my weight peaked 180 pounds, I would starve myself the next day. So it weant for years.

Now that I am 41, having spent my 30s building a medical practice and raising a daughter, I am 5’9″ and 220 pounds. I am obese based on my Body Mass Index. Me, obese, a former diet doctor! What happened?

Clearly my metabolism has slowed although comprehensive lab tests I collected on myself show I am in the normal range.

In recent weeks and months I have dropped my calorie intake to 1500 calories daily without weight loss. I have not had a cookie, a sweet, or ice cream in months. I have been in the gym 3-5 days weekly for at least 20-30 minutes breaking a sweat–not the ironman of workouts but something is better than nothing.

I consulted a bariatric surgeon, was signed up to have a $16,000 lap band put around my stomach. But after reviewing the data and speaking to half a dozen friends and patients who had the procedure, I cancelled the surgery. Most studies show patients regain their weight within a few years.

I have been on Belviq (bupropion plus naltrexone) which is a relatively new non-controlled non-stimulant weight loss drug for 6 weeks and my weight is unchanged.

Am I frustrated, yes! Have I given up my “skinny jeans” I wore 10 years ago, not yet.

Am I ready to starve myself for months to get back to 180 pounds? Not really.

Am I ready to dive back into the gym or start running again, given that it seems I would need to put in twice the time and energy to maintain my goal weight of 180 pounds, maybe.

I see these hollywood stars my age with terrific physiques and know if they can do it, so can I.

My current plan: drop my calorie intake to 800 to 1200 calories daily, double my time in the gym, speak to my doctor about Topamax which is a non-controlled medicine which also shows efficacy for weight loss. I will not take the stimulant weight loss medicines like phentermine or Vyvanse, they work but are habit forming and tolerance can easily occur within weeks to months if used daily.

My scale and I will keep you posted.