A Weight Loss Doctor New Years Resolution to Lose Weight P.2

January 15th, 2017

by Natan Schleider, M.D.

So as a 41 year old male standing 5 feet 9 inches and weighing 220 pounds (I weighed about 180 in college, always been fairly stocky genetically but even I am not immune to desiring all the Hollywood actors incredible physiques my age or older), I calculated my BMR or Basal Metabolic Rate on line.

The BMR formula also called the Harris Benedict Equation can be calculated at these websites and tells you roughly how many calories you burn each day based on height, weight, gender, lifestyle, and age:

http://www.bmi-calculator.net/bmr-calculator/harris-benedict-equation/

http://manytools.org/handy/bmr-calculator/

Once you know this, you can calculate how much of a calorie deficit you need to lose weight daily. For example, my BMR is guesstimates that if I lie in bed all day and do nothing, I burn 2441 calories to maintain my weight. Frankly that sounds high because I have been eating rather healthy (no sweets, pizza, french fries, etc) but have lost no weight in months (since I started paying attention at age 40).

Knowing that one pound of fat is 3500 calories, if I cut my calorie intake by 500 calories daily (or burn 500 more calories daily exercising), I should lose one pound a week if my diet remains unchanged. Alternatively, I reduce my calorie intake by 500 calories daily and should get the same result.

Note that after age 30, our metabolic rate slows by about 5-10 percent per decade (it feels like a lot slower personally so I’m with you if you are middle age and been eating and exercising on some level and not losing weight as you did in your 20s or 30s).

I plan on going to the gym for mostly weight lifting which I enjoy at least 15 minutes daily, cutting my daily calories by 500, and am currently trialing two medicines with data showing they promote weight loss, bupropion/naltrexone (Belviq) and will soon be adding on toprimate (Topamax).

I wish I could have the weight off in a few weeks but that is not realistic and “good things come to those who weight [pun intended].”

If anybody is reading this and wants to know how I am doing–or has any advice–I am all ears.

If I write a part 3 to this segment of my blog, I will research anti-aging medicine supplements to promote muscle mass and fat loss.

 

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