An aspirin a day keeps the heart attack (and colon cancer) away.

Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), is a medication used to treat pain, fever, and inflammation and is an NSAID (Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug). It is often not grouped with other NSAIDs because of it’s blood thinning effect by binding platelets.

It went into mas production in 1899, sold by Bayer, and was a blockbuster, the Viagra of its day (and that’s an understatement).

Unlike it’s more commonly used competitors in the NSAID family like ibuprofen (Advil) or naproxen (Allve), aspirin 81 mg daily REDUCES THE RISK OF HEART ATTACK AND STROKE AND COLON CANCER in patients that have ANY risk factors for these conditions like high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, male gender, the list goes on. [We can talk about the less discussed fact that most other NSAIDs like Advil and Alleve increase the risk of heart attack and stroke later, seems like some pharmaceutical companies don’t want this advertised, remember Bextra and Vioxx, I do].

Based on the United States Preventive Task Force a baby aspirin daily which is 81 mg is recommended ” for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and colorectal cancer (CRC) in adults aged 50 to 59 years who have a 10% or greater 10-year CVD risk, are not at increased risk for bleeding, have a life expectancy of at least 10 years, and are willing to take low-dose aspirin daily for at least 10 years.” [https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/RecommendationStatementFinal/aspirin-to-prevent-cardiovascular-disease-and-cancer].

I turned 41 this past November and I take a baby aspirin daily. It is dirt cheap. Does not bother my stomach. And, depending on the study, can reduce risk of a heart attack or stroke or colon cancer (and possibly breast cancer, endometrial cancer, and prostate cancer) by up to 10%, maybe more, maybe less, it is all about how much risk you have for developing those diseases.

There is a lot of data coming out about the benefits and risks of aspirin despite the fact that it was around two centuries ago–you’d think they would have come up with something conclusive by now, right?

Anywho, if I’m your doctor or you want to play doctor as many patients do by educating themselves on the internet, tell me your thoughts.

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